REVIEW: GRLwood, "Daddy"


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GRLwood
"daddy"

Now available on sonaBLAST! Records.


Many have described the Louisville duo GRLWood in terms of riot grrrl, and certainly guitarist Rej Forester’s singsong-to-scream vocal stylings against dissonance surf rock riffs lend to that comparison, it would sell their incredibly unique sound short to pigeonhole them into a certain sound or the aesthetic trappings that come with the riot grrrl name. Daddy, their debut album, invokes the B-52s as much as Bratmobile — a sardonic quality you can dance to as much as you can scream along with.

What stood out to me throughout Daddy were the ways GRLWood plays with tone and tempo in their songs. “I’m Yer Dad” leads off with a soft repeating of the phrase, while the drums and staccato guitar build the tension until the vocals reach a frenzy, bouncing from a scream back to the initial singsong cadence. The lyrics play off masculine tropes, mocking man caves and muscle cars alike from the perspective of the dad in question. The following track, “Nice Guy,” follows this pattern of parody as well. In this way, Forester embodies these incredibly loathsome kinds of men, and turns their catchphrases “all of the bad guys get all of the good girls / and I just don’t understand why they won’t fuck me” into weapons against them, skewering them on their own rhetoric.

On “Clean,” Forester begs the questions “who you gettin’ clean for?” She repeats it several times over before the track comes to a head in an earth-movingly volatile chorus, before dropping back to the gentler tempo of the first verse with a soft “woah oh". All of the songs seem to follow some variation on this; vacillating wildly between softer dissonant moments and then escalating all at once into something explosive, almost manic, and undeniably powerful.

There’s an overall hectic feeling to Daddy. The frenzied energy of trying to capture the anger and frustration of existing as a queer person is palpable in not only every scream, but in all of the subtle tongue in cheek quips as well.

Whether the frustration expressed is from trying to get a girl you’re pining over to dump her loser boyfriend (“Bisexual”), or a sarcastic response to the ignorance we’re bombarded with every day from those outside the community (“Vaccines Made Me Gay”), GRLWood delivers rage in a way that is attractive without seeming pandering or too polished up. It’s not contrived anger, it’s so deeply real and deeply felt. Listening to this album, it’s easy to forget that this band only has two members — they deliver an all encompassing sound, larger than life in order to best express all of the intricacies dealt with in the subject matter.

Daddy is an incredible album for someone who wants more rage in their pop music, or who doesn’t want to compromise melody or fun when they seek out heavier queer musicians. As a debut, it’s explosive, it simply does not sound like anything else right now and there’s no doubt that GRLWood is on the precipice of something truly great.


Stream Daddy Below:


REVIEW: Courtney Barnett, "Tell Me How You Really Feel"


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courtney barnett
"tell me how you really feel"

Now available on MOM+POP Music.


by Anna DiTucci-Cappiello

On first listen, Tell Me How You Really Feel is a perfect summer record. Songs associated with summer are typically near nauseatingly upbeat and positive, evoking images of beaches. Barnett explores a more wistful sound, turning the trope of summer music sideways while delivering strong, surf influenced guitar riffs and deadpan vocal delivery that made her initial effort so well-loved. By panning away from introspection, Barnett turns the focus on to those around her. She speaks of the perceptions of friends, lovers, strangers, and all in between while still baring herself vulnerable yet confident manner.

One of Barnett’s strong suits lies in her lyrics. They convey a wry wit, speaking of personal interactions that have the possibility of being near-universal while also maintaining specificity — there’s a genius to being able to do that well without pandering, and she hits the nail on the head in that regard. This is seen again on “Nameless, Faceless,” exploring what it means to be a woman making art in the current social climate. Barnett bottles the tumultuousness and anger of creating under patriarchy and delivers it in a straightforward package.

“I’m Not Your Mother, I’m Not Your Bitch” speaks to the dichotomy in interpersonal relationships that nearly any non-man will be able to relate to. If you aren’t nurturing and self effacing, you’re classed under ‘bitch’ — angry, bitter, only worthy of scorn from others. A sense of exhaustion comes of that as the last lines ring out, "Put up or shut up, it's all the same / It's all the same, never change, never change.”

This type of lyrical prowess shines through on “City Looks Pretty.” Lyrics like "The city looks pretty when you been indoors/For 23 days I've ignored all your phone calls/And everyone's waiting when you get back home/They don't know where you been, why you gone so long.” will ring too true for anyone prone to bouts of self-isolation. This all is bookended by an impossibly catchy melody, assuredly leaving you dancing in catharsis while singing along to “sometimes I get sad/ it’s not all that bad.”

Sonically, Tell Me How You Really Feel verges on a very retro vibe, but it isn’t forced or hokey. Directness as explored in the lyrics is anchored by psychedelic inspired guitar riffs and simple yet evocative drums, ensuring the message she crafts are delivered successfully and pointedly. It’s rock and roll and folk and pop all simultaneously, interweaving the best things from all genres — sing-song melodies in the choruses, full but not extravagant guitar solos, and an extraordinarily clever storytelling ability.

On Tell Me How You Really Feel, Courtney Barnett finds the middle ground, panning away from introspection while still sticking true to the hallmarks that made her first album so well loved. Overall, Tell Me How You Really Feel is a summer album for the melancholic. Those who spent the winter indoors leaving texts on read and cancelling plans, can step out into the sun with this as their soundtrack — a smart, catchy record that feels as warm and complicated as the changing of the seasons.


Stream Tell Me How You Really Feel on Spotify:


COURTNEY BARNETT TOUR DATES

UK and Europe
Sat 25 May - Belfast at BBC’s Biggest Weekend (tix)
Tues 29 May - Leeds at O2 Academy (tix) +
Wed 30 May - Brussels at Ancienne Belgique (tix) +
Thurs 31 May - Utrecht at Tivoli Vredenburg Ronda (tix) +
Sat 2 June - Glasgow at Barrowlands (tix) +
Sun 3 June - London at All Points East Festival (tix)
Mon 4 June - Manchester at Academy (tix) +
Tues 5 June - Bristol at O2 Academy (tix) +
Wed 6 June - London at Roundhouse (tix) +
Sat 9 June - Paris at Bataclan (tix) +
Sun 10 June - Luxembourg at Den Atelier (tix) +
Mon 11 June - Berlin at Astra Kulturhaus (tix) +
Wed 13 June - Cologne at Live Music Hall (tix) +

USA and Canada
Fri 6 July - Winnipeg, MB at Winnipeg Folk Festival (tix)
Sat 7 July - Des Moines, IA at 80/35 Festival (tix)
Mon 9 July - Toronto, ON at Danforth Music Hall (tix) ^
Tues 10 July - Toronto, ON at Danforth Music Hall (SOLD OUT) ^
Wed 11 July - Ottawa, ON at Ottawa Blues Festival (tix)
Thurs 12 July - North Adams, MA at MASS MoCA (tix) ^
Sat 14 July - Columbus, OH at Newport Music Hall (tix) ^
Sun 15 July - Louisville, KY at Forecastle Festival (tix)
Tues 17 July - St. Louis, MO at The Pageant (tix) ^
Wed 18 July - Kansas City, MO at Truman (tix) ^
Fri 20 July - Chicago, IL at Pitchfork Music Festival (tix)
Sat 21 July - Minneapolis, MN at Surly Brewing Festival Field (tix) ~#
Sun 22 July - Edmonton, AB at Intersteller Rodeo (tix)
Tues 24 July - Washington DC at The Anthem (tix) ^#
Wed 25 July - Brooklyn, NY at Celebrate Brooklyn Prospect Park (tix) ^#
Thurs 26 July - Portland, ME at State Theatre (tix) #
Sat 28 July - Newport, RI at Newport Folk Festival (SOLD OUT)
Sat 29 Sept - Denver, CO at Ogden Theatre (tix) ++
Sun 30 Sept - Denver, CO at Ogden Theatre (tix) ++
Tues 2 Oct - Phoenix, AZ at The Van Buren (tix) ++
Wed 3 Oct - San Diego, CA at The Observatory North Park (tix) ++
Fri 5 Oct - Los Angeles, CA at The Greek Theatre (tix) ++
Mon 8 Oct - Seattle, WA at Paramount Theatre (tix) ++
Wed 10 Oct - Vancouver, BC at Vogue Theatre (tix) ++
Fri 12 Oct - Portland, OR at Crystal Ballroom (tix) ++
Sun 14 Oct - Oakland, CA at Treasure Island Music Festival (tix)
Wed 17 Oct - Milwaukee, WI at Pabst Theater (tix) ++
Sun 21 Oct - Boston, MA at House of Blues (tix) ++
Tues 23 Oct - Philadelphia, PA at The Fillmore (tix) ++
Thurs 25 Oct - Nashville, TN at Marathon Music Works (tix) ++
Sat 27 Oct - Austin, TX at Stubb's (tix) ++

Australia and New Zealand
Fri 17 Aug - Thebarton Theatre, Adelaide (tix) *
Sat 18 Aug - Metropolis, Fremantle (tix) *
Weds 22 Aug - The Tivoli, Brisbane (tix) *
Thurs 23 Aug - Sydney Opera House (tix)
Sat 25 Aug - Sydney Opera House (tix)
Weds 29 Aug - The Powerstation, Auckland (tix) *
Thurs 30 Aug - Opera House, Wellington (tix) *
Sat 1 Sept - Festival Hall, Melbourne (tix) *

% with Palehound
^^ with LALA LALA
+ with Loose Tooth
^ with Vagabon
~ with Lucy Dacus
# with Julien Baker
++ with Waxahatchee
* with East Brunswick All Girls Choir


REVIEW: Nature Shots, "Foreclosure"

With a title that evokes the feeling of an ending and despair of sorts, Nature Shots’ Michi Tassey draws out the beauty in finality interspersed with a dreamy look as to what’s next. This is the first recorded solo effort from Tassey, who is otherwise occupied with the notably more guitar heavy, emo-adjacent People Like You. 

Were there to be a single word to encapsulate Foreclosure, it’d be “ethereal.” However, the beauty of the album comes from the fact that it can’t be boiled down to a word, or a genre, but instead shines through the layering of emotions. Massey is able to clearly convey sorrow, longing, and desperation in a way that savors them but doesn’t wallow. Her voice is wistful, yet powerful, and the piano that drives the songs is compelling, creating an encompassing sound that’s simultaneously minimalistic by using the negative space between the instruments as an instrument of its own. 

There’s a church like tone throughout Foreclosure, the songs playing out like a distorted hymn. It’s not a strict or traditional religious vibe, but draws from the kind of desperation that can turn one to prayer, to seek out comfort where no tangible one can be found.  “What is the Word for When You are Screaming but No One Can Hear” starts out with a tense note repeated and blooms into arpeggios and fades in and out, punctuated by dissonant guitar and and Tassey’s voice compelling you, “mama, mama, mama, please don’t cry.” 

“Fickle Folly” does a perfect job as a final track, evoking a near playground like melody. “I still hear you singing to me,” rings out as the lyric that closes the album, turning towards a hope in loss and in an ending, while still letting that sorrow be felt wholly. 

Foreclosure is a breathtaking collection of songs and a solid initial solo effort from Tassey. It serves catharsis not through ferocity or anger, but a kind of complex yearning. Even with all of the layers, musically and emotionally, the album serves up something tangible and whole — no easy task when taking on the nuance of loss and grieving.
 

photo by  Adam Frizzell

It serves to be noted that this album was produced, recorded, and mixed by Cam Boucher, albeit before his recent outing as an abuser and unsafe person. I, and Hooligan on whole, do not endorse Boucher in any way and actively condemn instances of emotional, physical, mental, and sexual abuse. Instead, let this serve to focus this on Tassey who was unaware of these actions during the process of making Foreclosure.